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Here’s What You Need to Know About “Squirting”
by Ashley Cobb
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March 16, 2021

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Here’s What You Need to Know About “Squirting”

Woman laying on the floor (Photo courtesy of rawpixel.com)
Courtesy of rawpixel.com

One of the biggest urban legends in the history of sex is the concept of “squirting.” This has sparked some of the most consistent inquiries such as: Is it real? Can every women squirt? Is it pee? The list of questions is endless. When it comes to squirting people tend to fall into one of several categories; those who’ve experienced it, seen it in porn, or simply heard about it. In fact, according to data collected by Pornhub, from 2010 to 2017 searches for “women squirting” drastically increased. Which means you’re definitely not alone in your curiosity about squirting.

What exactly is squirting? 

So, let’s break it down! There is a lot of debate surrounding what squirting actually is, but one thing that we do know is that it involves the Skene gland. The latest research found that squirting is actually a gush of fluid coming out of the urethra created in the Skene’s gland. The Skene’s glands are located on the upper wall of the vagina, near the lower end of the urethra. 

So now we know why people would ask, “Wait, so is squirting pee?” 

Some researchers say yes while others say no. What’s been proven is the fluid released during squirting does contain traces of urine and other fluids.  

Can every women squirt?

Couple kissing (Credit: @according2kana)
Credit: @according2kana

Well, that’s unclear. It’s estimated that between 10 and 50 percent of women squirt during sex, according to The International Society for Sexual Medicine. Some experts believe all women can squirt, with the right technique, amount, and type of penetration. For a lot of women, squirting often goes unnoticed. Unlike in porn, some women only squirt a small amount of fluid. According to a 2013 study of 320 participants, the amount of fluid released can range from approximately 0.3ml to more than 150ml. That’s anything from a few drops to half a cup.

How do you squirt?

Some women squirt involuntarily, while others can do it on command. Some experience it with every sexual encounter and others once in a blue moon — or not at all. No matter where you fall on the squirting spectrum the key to squirting is the G-spot. 

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Stimulating the G-Spot is the secret sauce to squirting.You can find your G-spot by sticking a finger in your vagina and making a “come hither” motion. You’ll know you have located the spot if you feel a small ridged area along the front of your vaginal wall. You can also use a toy. G-spot toys are perfect for both solo or partnered exploration because, let’s be honest, fingers get tired, and rarely are penises enough (just saying). 

G-spot toys are specifically made with a curve that hits your G-spot in a nice pleasurable way.  Being on top also helps when trying to squirt. Woman-on-top positions—whether you’re facing or reverse cowgirl-ing it — helps you control the angle of the penis and helps to hit the spot just right.

Fun fact: 

Woman lying on bed (Photo courtesy of Pexels.com)
Courtesy of Pexels.com

You don’t always need internal stimulation to make yourself squirt, you can squirt solely from clitoris stimulation. The G-spot is part of your clitoral network, which means that when you’re stimulating the G-spot, you’re actually stimulating part of the clitoris. So when you touch your clitoris you will be indirectly stimulating your G-spot as well. 

Squirting is a fun addition, it’s not the end all be all to sex. It’s important to remember to not get fixated on it if it’s not coming easily for you. Plenty of people have extremely satisfying sex lives to inlcude amazing orgasms without ever squirting. 

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